Seven good things, and six bad things about Ontario’s new climate plan

//Seven good things, and six bad things about Ontario’s new climate plan

Seven good things, and six bad things about Ontario’s new climate plan

Today, Ontario released it’s environment plan Preserving and protection our environment for future generations: A made-in-Ontario environment plan. Within that plan is Ontario’s new climate change plan. On the climate change front, there is good news and bad news.

The good news

  1. there’s not a denial of climate change (sad that this qualifies as good news)
  2. there seems to be a commitment to assess climate vulnerability and to make information available to the public on climate change impacts
  3. a bit on transportation: increased ethanol use, support for CNG
  4. coordinated accelerated capital cost allowance with feds for clean technologies
  5. increased natural gas DSM
  6. a consideration of food waste and landfill emissions
  7. appears to be an implicit acceptance that the federal carbon tax will survive the legal challenge (since it envisages the money from it possibly increasing funds in the Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund)

The bad news:

  1. blind assumption that the Canadian 2030 targets should be equal across the country without consideration of the economic structure of the provinces ― Ontario needs to do more. This plan proposes less than previous Ontario plan
  2. not a word about 2050 targets or actions to get there
  3. although much like the cap and trade program for large emitters, the emissions performance standard is missing a key component – the cap
  4. a lot of considering, encouraging and exploring
  5. The Ontario Carbon Trust will be trying to pick winners and losers
  6. Claim to make polluters accountable, but misses the fact that was what cap and trade did
By |2018-11-30T09:35:37+00:00Nov 29th, 2018|News|0 Comments

About the Author:

David is the CEO and Founder of IndEco.